Friday, March 4, 2011



In contextual situations, it appears that members of organizations work at the transparent, operative level to achieve common outcomes -- at least in Western cultures. In these cases, the establishment of desired common outcomes might typically result from negotiated compromises, mediated settlements, or other transactional considerations; and members of given organizations enter into these (or not) with relative freedom. The associated organizations then arguably reach specific, desired outcomes, as those outcomes come to fruition from the voluntary, proactive or reactive alignment of members' values, goals, and efforts. Even when differences in motivations between members result in hidden or secret agendas and those agendas yield political in-fighting, the accomplishment of the organizations' goals generally remain the focal concern of the members. In non-contextual situations, the political or cultural agendas of the one or of the few present as more important than the agendas and transparency concerns of the many. Although desired outcomes might still result from negotiated compromises, mediated settlements, or other transactional considerations; members' relative freedoms to do or to not do and the voluntary alignment of their values, goals, and efforts all present as issues of secondary, tertiary, or irrelevant importance. Generally, in these cases, the accomplishment of the leaders' wills remain the focal concern of the members.

As opposed to contextual situations for which organizational members employ management or leadership, non-contextual situations likely provide appropriate opportunities for those members to employ ruling or lordship and dictatorship. Ruling or lordship seems to present as appropriate in non-emergent situations and dictatorship in emergent situations. As with managers, rulers employ standard operating procedures, looking to maximize efficiency and effectiveness in accomplishing tasks, objectives, and goals. As with leaders, those who dictate do so without using standard operating procedures, looking to mitigate loss or success. Unlike situations that call for the employment of management or leadership, the use of lordship or dictatorship primarily work to further the ruler or dictators’ ideological agendas. Therefore, in non-contextual situations, organizations would necessarily place higher priorities on accomplishing the wills of the directors than they would on placing high priorities on content-based, contextual needs, as otherwise generally acknowledged by the organizations (or societies) relevant stakeholders. Appropriate applications for the employment of lordship might emerge in situations that present with ambiguous or limited information. Appropriate applications for the employment of dictatorship might emerge in situations that present varying, variable, or otherwise changing dynamics, for which no unique set of standard operating procedures could exist.

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